Partner im RedaktionsNetzwerk Deutschland
Höre The Energy Podcast in der App.
Höre The Energy Podcast in der App.
(7.565)(6.472)
Sender speichern
Wecker
Sleeptimer
Sender speichern
Wecker
Sleeptimer

The Energy Podcast

Podcast The Energy Podcast
Podcast The Energy Podcast

The Energy Podcast

Shell
hinzufügen
The world faces a critical challenge: how to meet growing energy demand while urgently reducing carbon dioxide emissions. It means the global energy system must... Mehr
The world faces a critical challenge: how to meet growing energy demand while urgently reducing carbon dioxide emissions. It means the global energy system must... Mehr

Verfügbare Folgen

5 von 32
  • How Can Carbon Markets Limit Climate Change?
    Carbon markets are advancing on a global level, following the first country-to-country trades at COP27. The Energy Podcast investigates how carbon pricing works and examines what role it can play in the race to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Presented by Julia Streets. Featuring Dr Hasan Muslemani from the Oxford Institute of Energy Studies, Andrea Bonzanni from the International Emissions Trading Association and Shell’s senior carbon pricing policy advisor, Dr Malek Al-Chalabi. With additional contribution by Stephen Kansuk, Head of Environment and Climate Change at the United Nations in Ghana. The Energy Podcast is a Fresh Air Production for Shell, produced by Annie Day and Sarah Moore, and edited by Molly Lynch and Sophie Curtis.   EPISODE TRANSCRIPT: 00:00Julia Streets: Today  on  The  Energy  Podcast... MUSIC BED COMES IN Andrea Bonzanni: Emissions must be reduced globally irrespective of where they take place. The atmosphere is one at the end of the day. Article VI allows reducing emissions where it’s more efficient. Dr Hasan Muslemani: We have solutions that are being praised as the holy grail of net- zero… The issue is that we need all the solutions that we can get because in the fight against climate change, we are really in a race against time. Julia Streets: The  cost  of  climate  change.  It's  a  phrase  commonly  used  by  governments,  companies,  and  campaigners  across  the  world  when  discussing  the  need  to  limit  global  warming  to  well  below  two  degrees  Celsius.  Quantifying  the  exact  cost  of  far- reaching  effects  of  climate  change  is  not  an  easy  task.  But  putting  a  price  on  emissions  is  viewed  by  many  as  an  effective  means  to  help  drive  down  levels  of  CO2  in  the  atmosphere.  The  idea  is  simple.  Putting  a  price  on  carbon  emissions  creates  a  financial  incentive  to  reduce  them.Carbon  markets  have  existed  for  decades.  There  are  many  carbon  pricing  systems  around  the  world,  but  at  present,  it  is  estimated  that  only  a  quarter  of  emissions  are  priced.  That  could  soon  change.  At  last  year's  COP27  climate  conference  in  Egypt,  the  first  country- to- country  carbon  trades  took  place.  Could  this  pave  the  way  for  further  uptake  of  carbon  trading  and  what  impact  could  that  have  in  the  fight  against  global  warming? Hello,  I'm  Julia  Streets,  and  today  on  The  Energy  Podcast:  How  can  carbon  markets  limit  climate  change? MUSIC ENDS   With  me  to  discuss  this  are  Andrea  Bonzanni,  who's  the  international  policy  director  at  the  International  Emissions  Trading  Association,  who  you  may  well  remember  from  a  previous  episode  of  The  Energy  Podcast.  He  is  joined  by  Dr.  Hasan  Muslemani, who is  the  head  of  Carbon  Management  Research  at  the  Oxford  Institute  for  Energy  Studies.  And  our  third  guest  is  Dr.  Malek  Al- Chalabi,  who  is  a  senior  carbon  pricing  policy  advisor  at  Shell. Hasan,  perhaps  I  could  start  with  you.  For  the  benefit  of  the  audience,  would  you  just  mind  explaining  what  we  mean  when  we  talk  about  carbon  markets? 02:18Dr. Hasan Muslemani: The  fundamental  concept  behind  a  carbon  market  is  really  to put  a  price  on  carbon,  or  in  other  words,  to  quantify  the  cost  of  damages  that  emissions  will  cost  our  society  over  time.  To  do  this,  we  have, at  the  heart  of  carbon  markets,  what  is  called  carbon  accounting  or  greenhouse  gas  accounting.  This  represents  a  set  of  standards  and  methods  that  help  us  quantify  but  also  verify  the  impact  that  each  business  creates  on  the  environment,  and  this  impact  is  reported  in  terms  of  tons  of  CO2  emitted. Now,  something  that  I  really  want  to  emphasize  here  is  that  today,  we  speak  of  carbon  markets,  but  we  need  to  differentiate  between  two  different  types  of  markets.  The  first  is  what  we  call  a  compliance  market,  which  is  a  market  that  is  heavily  regulated  and  corresponds  to  a  specific  region  or  jurisdiction,  and  where  companies  within  that  jurisdiction  have  to  take  part  in  the  market.  The  other  one  is  a  voluntary  one.  This  is  a  lot  less  regulated  and  where  participation  is  voluntary,  as  the  name  implies.  The  voluntary  carbon  market  is  based  on  the  concept  of  offsetting.  That  is  where  a  company  wishes  to  mitigate  or  neutralize  its  own  emissions.  So,  it  goes  out  and  invests  in  projects  which  are  reducing  equivalent  amounts  of  emissions  elsewhere  in  the  world. 03:30Julia Streets: Can  you  talk  to  us a little bit about how  they  work  in  practice  in  everyday  terms? 03:36Dr. Hasan Muslemani: Starting  on  the  compliance  markets, and  the  objective  is  really  to  put  a  price  on  carbon,  there's  two  different  ways  to  do  this.  The  first  one  is  carbon  taxation,  which  should  be  a  simple  concept.  We  have  countries  like  Norway  and  Denmark,  which  would  impose  a  specific  tax  on  every  ton  of  CO2  that  a  company  would  produce  within  those  countries.  The  key  here,  really,  is  for  that  carbon  tax  to  be  high  enough  to  incentivize  businesses  to  change  behavior  or  to  move  to  greener  production.  This  is  essentially  a  stick  form  of  regulation  where  businesses  have  to  lower  their  emissions  or  face  an  additional  cost. The  other  mechanism,  which  is  a  cap  and  trade  mechanism,  which  is  the  more  familiar  one,  and in  this  system  we  have  an  authority,  say,  the  European  Commission,  which  sets  a  cap  on  how  much  emissions  can  be  generated  as  a  whole  within  the  continent,  within  Europe,  and  then  allocates  a  number  of  allowances  or  carbon  credits  to  European  countries  and  companies  for  them  to  trade  amongst  each  other.  Here,  each  carbon  credit  or  allowance  is  representative  of  one  ton  of  CO2. This  allocation  process,  what  I  want  to  note,  is  done  using  the  historical  emissions  of  each  one  of  these  companies.  This  is  a  process  that  we  call  grandfathering.  The  overall  cap  is  reduced  each  year  in  order  to  meet  a  certain  European  climate  target  in  the  future.  The  way  this  works  is  where  companies  that  have  lowered  their  emissions  below  their  targets,  now  they  have  surplus  of  allowances,  which  they  can  go  into  the  market  and  sell  to  companies  that  did  not  do  so  well  and  will  require  to  buy  credits.  So,  this  mechanism  really  is  sort  of  a  carrot  but  also  a  stick  sort  of  regulation. 05:12Julia Streets: Thank  you  for  explaining  how  they  work.  I  suppose  my  next  question,  is  how  effective  are  they  proving  to  be? 05:19Dr. Hasan Muslemani: The  longest  running  and  actually  the  biggest  ETS  in  the  world,  that  is  the  EU ETS  or  emission  trading  scheme.  This  has  started  in  2008  and  has  gone  through  different  phases  over  the  years.  But  I  do  want  to  mention  that  it  has  suffered  from  a  number  of  setbacks  over  those  years.  To  give  an  overview,  the  carbon  price  at  the  beginning  was  around  30  euros  per  ton,  but  that  price  has  crashed  to  less  than  5  euros  around  the  financial  crisis  of  '09.  This  was  most  likely  because  of  two  main  reasons.  The  first  one  is  that  companies  had  to  report  their  emissions  in  such  a  regulated  manner  that  they  have  not  done  before,  and  so  they  might  have  overestimated  how  much  emissions  they  emit  and  hence  how  much  allowances  they  eventually  received  from  the  system.  But  also,  because  of  the  financial  crisis  itself,  it  meant  that  business  offices  aren't  lit,  emissions  aren't  as  high  as  usual,  so  they  did  not  need  to  surrender  as  much  allowances  at  the  end  of  the  compliance  phase,  which  eventually  meant  there's  an  oversupply  of  credits  in  the  market,  and  so  the  price  has  crashed. The  good  news  is  the  EU ETS  has  gone  through  sort  of  a  recovery  mode  over  the  past  10  years,  and  today  the  price  has  not  only  recovered  but  reached  the  level  which  is  believed  to  incentivize  most  sectors  to  lower  emissions,  and  that  level  is  around  100  euros  per  ton. 06:41Julia Streets: It's  been  so  helpful  to  get  a  sense  of  progress,  thinking  about  the  dynamics  of the  market  since  launch,  and  also  to  think  about  the  market  share. Andrea,  let  me  bring  you  in  here  because  this  is  about  the  world's  attempts  to  limit  global  warming  to  well  below  two  degrees  Celsius,  in  line  with  the  Paris  Agreement.  Are  we  likely  to  see  the  growth  of  carbon  markets  in  pursuit  of  this  great  ambition? 07:03Andrea Bonzanni: Well,  we  know  that  meeting  the  goals  of  the  Paris  Agreement  requires  a  radical  transformation  of  many  areas  of  our  economies  and  our  lives,  and  for  the  reason  outlined  by  Hasan,  carbon  markets  and  carbon  pricing  in  general  are  one  of  the  tools  that  governments  are  increasingly  considering.  Carbon  markets  are  spreading  from  a  core  of  rich  runs  economies  such  as  the  EU,  California,  South  Korea, and  New  Zealand,  to  middle- income  and  emerging  countries.  This  year,  we  had  Mexico  and  Indonesia  launching  their  emission  trading  systems,  and  the  two  schemes  are  expected  to  expand  and  evolve  over  time.  There  are  other  countries  in  Southeast  Asia  and  Latin  America  that  are  implementing  carbon  markets,  and  even  some  African  countries  are  starting  to  consider  them. 07:45Julia Streets: Andrea,  when  we  last  spoke,  you  would  just  at  COP27.  As  I  mentioned  in  the  introduction,  that's  when  the  first  country- to- country  carbon  trade  took  place.  Could  you  tell  us  a  bit  more  about  that and  what  happened  at  COP27? 07:58Andrea Bonzanni: Sure.  At  COP27,  Ghana  authorized  the  transfer  to  Switzerland  of  certified  emission  reductions.  This  transaction  was  the  first  of  its  kind  under  Article  VI  of  the  Paris  Agreement.  There  were  emission  reductions  generated  in  Ghana  thanks  to  the  implementation  of enhanced  rice  production  techniques  that  avoided  CO2  and  methane  emissions.  These  emissions  will  be  counted  towards  the  climate  target  of  Switzerland.  In  turn,  Ghana  commits  to  apply  a  corresponding  adjustment  to  its  emission  account. Mechanisms  like  this  have  vast  potential  to  generate  investment  flows  in  climate  change  mitigation  and  sustainable  development  from  the  Global  North  to  the  Global  South.  Article  VI is  still  a  small,  nascent  market,  but  we  expect  it  to  grow  and  countries  are  looking  to  buy  and  sell  emissions  to  each  other. In  addition  to  Ghana  and  Switzerland,  after  COP27,  another  transfer  was  authorized,  this  time  from  Thailand  to  Switzerland.  A  country  like  Japan  has  26  bilateral  agreements  with  countries  around  the  world  and  is  looking  to  import  emission  reductions  in  the  near  future.  Countries  like  Singapore,  South  Korea,  New  Zealand  and  Canada  are  all  looking  to  purchase  carbon  reduction  from  abroad.  Many  countries  around  the  world,  mostly  developing  countries,  are  preparing  and  getting  ready  to  become  sellers  in  this  market. 09:20Julia Streets: Andrea,  just  picking  up  on  one  of  the  comments  you  made  there.  One  project  being  implemented  under  the  Ghana- Switzerland,  Article  VI  carbon  pricing  deal  is  a  UN  initiative  that  aims  to  reduce  greenhouse  gas  emissions  from  rice  cultivation  by  training  local  farmers  in  sustainable  agriculture  practices.  Rice  cultivation  currently  accounts  for  over  10%  of  global  methane  emissions,  and  this  is  because  the  main  method  of  rice  farming  involves  flooding  the  fields,  which  prevents  oxygen  from  penetrating  the  soil,  causing  a  buildup  of  bacteria.  This  bacteria  emits  methane  into  the  atmosphere,  contributing  to  global  warming. The  United  Nations  Development  Program  aims  to  promote  climate- smart  rice  cultivation  for  Ghanian  farmers,  leading  to  a  significant  reduction  in  methane  emissions.  Stephen  Kansuk,  Head  of  Environment  and  Climate  Change at  the  United  Nations  in  Ghana,  speaking  from  the  capital  Accra,  told  us  more…. 10:18Stephen Kansuk: In  Ghana,  rice  is  cultivated  as  both  food  and  cash  crop.  Research  shows  that  in  2020,  Ghana's  total  rice  consumption  was  about  1. 4  million  metric  tons.  To  support  rice  farmers  to  reduce  methane  emissions  in  Ghana,  the  United  Nations  Development  Program,  the  Ministry  of  Environment  Science  Technology  Innovation,  the  Ministry  of  Food  and  Agriculture,  and  the  Environmental  Protection  Agency,  all  in  Ghana,  and  the  future  office  for  the  environment  in  Switzerland  are  implementing  a  climate- smart  rice  project. The  project  is  supporting  over  7, 000  rice  farmers  across  Ghana  to  adopt  an  alternate  wet  and  drying  technology  in  rice  cultivation  to  reduce  methane  emissions.  This  project  is  one  of  the  initiatives  under  a  partnership  between  the  government  of  Switzerland  and  Ghana.  The  agreement  is  to  allow  public  and  private  institutions  to  collaborate  to  invest  in  climate  change  mitigation  interventions  in  Ghana  and exchange  carbon  credits  with  Switzerland  for  payments. In  terms  of  benefits  with  this  climate  smart  rice  project,  our  target  is  to  achieve  about  1. 1  million  tons  of  carbon  dioxide  equivalents,  emission  reduction  targeted  by  2030.  The  project  will  also  provide  extra  incomes  for  the farmers  as  a  carbon  revenue  through  a  performance  bids  payment  system,  and  this  will  help  increase  their  resilience.  The  project  is  also  helping  to  create  a  number  of  jobs  at  the  rural  level  so  that  they  will  be  able  to  adapt  effectively  to  the  impact  of  climate  change. 12:14Julia Streets: Andrea,  I  wonder  if  I  could  bring  you  in  because  there  has  been  some  reaction  that  has  accused  governments  of  rich  countries  of  outsourcing  their  emissions  reductions  to  governments  of  developing  countries.  Is  that  fair? 12:27Andrea Bonzanni: Emissions  must  be  reduced  globally  irrespective  of  where  they  take  place.  The  atmosphere  is  one  at  the  end  of  the  day.  Article  VI  allows  reducing  emissions  where  it's  more  efficient,  deploying  capital  where  it  can  abate  or  remove  more  emissions.  Researchers  have  quantified  the  cost  savings  of  meeting  climate  targets  used  in  Article  VI  will  be  up  to  250  billion  US  dollars  a  year  by  2030. There  is  a  perception  out  there  that  projects  reducing  emissions  abroad  replace  strong  climate  action  at  home.  But  I  don't  think  there  is  evidence  supporting  this  thesis.  In  the  longer  run,  achieving  net- zero  means  that  every  ton  of  CO2  emitted  must  be  compensated  by a ton of  CO2  removed  from  the  atmosphere.  It  is  not  rational  to  believe  that  all  countries,  especially  European  ones,  can  get  to  net- zero  without  using  international  carbon  market  mechanisms.  International  carbon  markets  deploy  investments  in  things  like  natural  climate  solutions  or  emission  removal  technologies,  such  as  direct  air  captures,  bioenergy  with  CCS,  and  then  deploy  the  capital  where  these  projects  are  feasible.  Not  all  geographies,  not  all  jurisdictions  have  the  potential  to  scale  these  solutions  and  achieve  net- zero  within  their  borders. Rich  countries  need  strong  climate  action  both  at  home  and  abroad,  and  we  need  carbon  markets.  We  need  well- designed  one.  80%  of  countries  in  their  nationally  determined  contributions  said  that  they're  planning  to  use  carbon  markets  to  meet  their  goals.  So,  we  should  start  implementing  carbon  markets  soon  and  let  investment  flows  from  rich  countries  into  developing  countries. 14:02Julia Streets: So we've  explored  this  from  the  point  of  view  of  what  are  carbon  markets.  We've  thought  about  this  from  an  international  global  sort  of  point  of  view,  and  whether  or  not  this  is  fair  from  a  jurisdiction  point  of  view.  We've  also  heard  about  a  real  case  study  and  its  application  of  where  some  of  this  collaboration  comes  in. Malek,  could  I  ask  you,  from  a  corporate  point  of  view,  why  does  this  particularly  matter  to  a  company  like  Shell? 14:25Dr. Malek Al-Chalabi: Yeah,  thanks.  Thanks,  Julia.  At  Shell,  we've  set  a  target  to  become  a  net- zero  emissions  energy  business  by  2050,  and  our  policy  positions  on  climate  and  energy  transition  serve  as  a  global  framework  for  Shell's  advocacy  with  governments,  international  organizations,  and  associations.  This  includes  supporting  government  policies  that  will  help  the  world  to  achieve  net- zero  emissions  by  2050.  A  variety  of  policy  tools  are  required,  one  of  which  is  carbon  pricing,  and  at  Shell,  we  advocate  to  put  a  direct  price  on  carbon  emissions  as  part  of  a  broader  policy  framework  to  achieve  net- zero  emissions.  The  carbon  price,  whether  through  tax,  cap  and  trade,  or  hybrid  system,  should  apply  to  as  many  sectors  of  the  economy  as  possible  and  increase  over  time.  Additionally,  Shell  advocates  for  greater  international  cooperation  through  systems  that  transfer  carbon  credits  between  countries  and  ensure  that  international  carbon  credit  transactions  have  environmental  integrity  by  avoiding  double- counting  across  national  inventories.  In  summary,  a  carbon  price  can  be  an  effective  mechanism,  and  success  depends  on  it  being  part  of  a  comprehensive  energy  transition  policy  framework  that  incentivizes  innovation  and  encourages  commercialization  of  new  and  clean  technologies. 15:33Julia Streets: You  talked  there about  the  importance  of  collaboration.  I'm  curious,  what  needs  to  happen  to  get  more  countries  trading  carbon? 15:41Dr. Malek Al-Chalabi: If  we  look  at  the  data  from  the  World  Bank  and  look  back  30  years,  the  first  carbon  prices  took  place  in the  1990s.  If  we  fast- forward  today,  there's  approximately  70  carbon  pricing  initiatives  and,  as  you've  said,  covering  25%  of  the  world's  emissions,  which  represents  a  sizable  improvement.  But  this  still  means  that  75%  emissions  are  still  unpriced,  and  more  work  needs  to  be  done  in  this  space. I  think  it's  important  to  recognize  a  tremendous  amount  of  work  to  operationalize  carbon  pricing  policies  has  taken  place.  The  International  Chamber  of  Commerce  at  COP26  focused  on  global  carbon  pricing  principles  that  are  needed  to  help  deploy  carbon  markets,  and  at  COP27,  a  business  review  was  also  done  to  highlight  opportunities  for  decarbonization. There  are  10  principles  which  include,  but  are  not  limited  to,  focusing  on  greenhouse  gas  reduction  as  a  prime  target,  creating  a  reliable  and  predictable  overall  framework,  promoting  the  linkage  of  carbon  pricing  instruments,  and  ensuring  cooperation  for  greater  consistency  globally. 16:49Julia Streets: Hasan,  earlier  you  were  talking  about  some  of  the  market  dynamics  at  play.  I  would  love  to  get  your  thoughts  on  what  do  we  need  to  do  if  we  want  to  have  an  ambition  for  a  global  price  on  carbon? 17:01Dr. Hasan Muslemani: First  off,  I  would  say  it's  probably  not  easy  and  may  not  even  be  possible  to  have  one  carbon  price  that  fits  all  jurisdictions  in  the  world.  This  is  because  what  may  work  for  a  country  or  a  region  or a  jurisdiction  might  not  work  for  another.  We  might  have  some  that  prefer  a  carbon  tax  mechanism,  but  others  which  might  prefer  a  cap  and  trade,  or  an  emission  trading  scheme,  or  ETS  for  short.  Not  only  that,  but  the  sectors  which  are  included  within  these  different  ETSs  in  the  world  that  we  have  today  are  not  the  same  sectors.  Some  of  them  might  include  cement  or  steel  or  oil.  Some  others  might  include  different  sectors. To  give  an  example  from  my  own  background,  which  is  in  steel  production  in  China,  specifically.  Producing  steel  in  China  is  much  cheaper  than  in  Europe.  That's  the  first  thing.  The  second  thing  is  measures  which  we  have  that  we  can  take  to  lower  emissions  from  steel  production  in  China  versus  in  Europe  are  different  and  their  costs  are  different.  So,  that  means  that  the  abatement  costs  for  each  company  and  each  country  are  different. The  problem  with  not  having  a  global  price  becomes  important  when  trading  happens  between  these  regions,  so  if  you're  importing  or  exporting  steel  into  and  out  of  Europe.  For  that  reason,  I  think  carbon  prices  should  be  complemented  with  what  we  now  call  carbon  border  adjustments.  The  EU  has  already  introduced  such  a  mechanism  that  will  come  online  as  of  October  of  this  year.  Under  these  adjustments,  what  happens  is  any  steel  that  would  be  imported  from  China  into  the  EU  will  have  to  face  the  same  carbon  tax  based  on  its  carbon  footprint.  In  that  way,  the  steel  manufacturer  is  now  subject  to  the  carbon  price  in  Europe,  the  EU  ETS  price,  creating  what  I  would  like  to  call  an  implicit  global  carbon  price. 18:47Julia Streets: Andrea,  I'd  love  to  get  your  thoughts,  if  you  would,  about  some  of  the  risks  and  some  of  the  opportunities for Article VI? And what do  skeptics  say  about  its  limitations? 18:57Andrea Bonzanni: Well,  the  opportunities  generated  by  Article  VI  are  obvious.  They  go  down  to  basic  economic  theory.  We have  to  reduce  or  remove  emissions  where  it's  more  efficient  because  that  will  allow  us  to  do  it  faster  and  to  do  more  at  lower  cost.  So,  we  need  an  international  mechanism  that  brings  together  countries  with  access  to  capital  and  technologies,  but  without  access  to  cheaper  emission  abatement  options,  and  on  the  other  hand,  countries  without  capital  and  technology,  but  with  plenty  of  opportunities  for  reductions.  So  that's,  to  me,  very  clear;  it's  a  mechanism  that  can  work. Some  of  the  risks  around  Article  VI  are  related  to  the  complexity  of  these  mechanisms,  and  this  is  where  the  skeptics  are  coming  from.  Critics  have  magnified,  in  some  instances,  the  cases  where  carbon  markets  have  not  delivered  what  they  promised.  They  highlighted  cases  where  methodologies  to  calculate  carbon  reductions  were  not  robust,  or  measurements  overstated  the  impact  of  certain  projects.  However,  the  industry  is  aware  that  markets  need  to  improve,  and  there  are  many  initiatives  to  address  market  integrity. 20:06Julia Streets: Malek,  I'd  love  to  get  your  thoughts about what  are  your  hopes  for  the  carbon  markets  in  the  future? 20:12Dr. Malek Al-Chalabi: I  think  if  I  build  on  what  Andrea  has  said,  I  believe  further  operationalization  of  Article  VI  country- to- country  trades  increasing  in  the  future  would  be  a  welcome  development  to  take  place.  I  think  also,  as  some  may  know,  Article  VI. 4,  which  is  the  globally  led  carbon  market  by  the  UN,  looking  to  operationalize  in  the  next  one  to  three  years  would  also  be  another  welcome  development  to  help  facilitate  carbon  markets.  But  also,  as  Hasan  has  mentioned,  the  growth  of  compliance  and  voluntary  markets  would  also  be  a  welcome  development  where  countries  can  continue  to  use  implicit  or  explicit  carbon  pricing  mechanisms  to  help  further  incentivize  low  and  clean  technologies  at  a  price  that  is  helping  assist  decarbonization  efforts. 21:07Julia Streets: Gentlemen,  I'd  love  to  come  to  each  of  you  with  your  closing  thoughts  for  our  listeners. 21:12Andrea Bonzanni: Carbon  markets  need  to  grow.  Growth,  growth,  growth  is  what  we  need.  We  need  to  shift  gears,  scale  up  markets,  both  in  terms  of  coverage  and  in  terms  of  price  levels.  We  said  that  about  a  quarter  of  emissions  are  priced  nowadays,  but  the  World  Bank  estimates  that  only  4%  are  priced  at  the  level  that  will  allow  us  to  achieve  the  goals of  the  Paris  Agreement.  So,  whatever  the  economic  and  geopolitical  situation,  we  cannot  afford  to  put  carbon  markets  on  hold. 21:40Julia Streets: And Malek, what would be the one thing that you think that  the  audience  should  hang  onto  and  really  take  away? 21:45Dr. Malek Al-Chalabi: I  think  our  message  would  be  that  to  put  a  direct  price  on  carbon  emissions  as  part  of  a  broader  policy  framework  to  achieve  net- zero  emissions,  and  whether  it's  through  a  carbon  tax,  cap  and  trade,  or  a  hybrid,  they  should  apply  to  as  many  sectors  of  the  economy  as  possible  and  increase  over  time. 22:04Julia Streets: Hasan,  would  you  agree  with  that?  What  would  be  your  message? 22:07Dr. Hasan Muslemani: I  think  markets  have  already  picked  up  momentum,  and  they  are  here  to  stay.  The  next  step  is  really  to  ensure  integrity  of  what's  being  traded  and  sold  in  the  market.  That  word  integrity  has  really  become  the  buzzword  in  the  carbon  market  space  lately,  where  we're  seeing  a  lot  of  quality  frameworks  being  developed  to  define  what  is  integrity.  We  have  solutions  that  are  being  praised  as  the  holy  grail  of  net- zero  solutions,  such  as  capturing  CO2  directly  from  air  or  other  solutions,  and  they're  sort  of  being  put  in  competition  with  each  other.  The  issue  is  that  we  need  all  the  solutions  that  we  can  get  because  in  the  fight  against  climate  change,  we  are  really  in  a  race  against  time.  Because  this  task  is  so  critical  to  us  as  a  human  race,  if  anything,  it's  much  better  to  be  vaguely  right  than  precisely  wrong. MUSIC BED COMES IN 23:00Julia Streets: It's  been  a  wonderful  conversation  because  in  such  a  short  period  of  time,  we've  thought  about  the  dynamics  of  the  carbon  markets;  we've  thought  about  some  real  use  cases  of  how  there's  been  some  international  collaboration;  we've  thought  about  why  this  matters  for  different  people.  But  we've  also  been  very  considerate  in  terms  of  where are  some  of  the  limitations  and  perhaps  some  of  the  things  that  skeptics  are  talking  about.  But  this  is  about  integrity.  This  is  about  momentum,  and  this  is  about  growth.  Exactly  as  you  say,  this  is  all  about  us  using  all  the  tools  at  our  disposal  to  drive  change  at  pace  and  at  scale. Andrea  Bonzanni,  Dr.  Malek  Al- Chalabi,  and  Dr.  Hasan  Muslemani,  thank  you  very  much  for  being  with  us  today. You've  been  listening  to  The  Energy  Podcast,  brought  to  you  by  Shell.  Listen  and  follow  for  free  wherever  you  get  your  podcast  so  you  don't  miss  a  single  episode.  The  Energy  Podcast  is  a  Fresh  Air  Production,  and  I  must  remind  you  that  the  views  you've  heard  today  from  individuals  not  affiliated  with  Shell  are  their  own  and  not  Shell,  PLC,  or  its  affiliates.  I'm  Julia  Streets.  Thank  you  for  listening,  and  until  next  time,  goodbye. MUSIC ENDS  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
    17.5.2023
    24:15
  • Can A Divided World Tackle Climate Change?
    One year after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, The Energy Podcast investigates the impact of recent events on the global energy transition, drawing on Shell’s two latest Scenarios: Sky 2050 and Archipelagos. Presented by Julia Streets, featuring László Varró, head of Shell’s Scenarios team, and Dr Nat Keohane, President of the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES). Read more about the Energy Security Scenarios here. The Energy Podcast is a Fresh Air Production for Shell, produced by Annie Day and edited by Sophie Curtis.   EPISODE TRANSCRIPT:  00:00:00 Julia Streets: Today  on the  Energy  Podcast... MUSIC BED COMES IN Dr. Nat Keohane: The  energy  security  concerns  from  the  Russian  invasion  of  Ukraine  actually  accelerate  the  pace  of  the  energy  transition. Laszlo Varro:  There was no single global response. Europe  is  the  eye  of  the  storm.  It  is  Europe  where  the energy  crisis  had  by  far  the  biggest  impact.  This  is  a  situation  where  the  average  European  consumer  needed  no  explanation  that there  is  a  crisis.    00:28:41 Julia Streets: When  Russia  invaded  Ukraine,  the  world  was  already  facing  a  challenging  set  of  circumstances  with  post-COVID- 19  austerity  looming,  energy  prices  rising  and  security  tensions  growing.  The  invasion  amplified  many  of  these  challenges  and  brought  the  need  for  secure  supplies  of  affordable,  sustainable  energy  to  the  very  top  of  the  global  agenda.  Today,  we  will  be  exploring  the  tensions  that  have  been  unleashed  just  over  one  year  after  the  invasion,  with  security  issues,  global  energy  supply  and  geopolitical  alliances  all  in  flux.  We'll  also  be  discussing  how  these  tensions  could  be  resolved  in  a  world  that  needs  to  decarbonize,  drawing  on  Shell's  latest  scenarios  research.  Hello,  I'm  Julia  Streets  and  today  on  the  Energy  Podcast,  can  a  divided  world  tackle  climate  change? MUSIC ENDS   Allow  me  to  introduce  my  guest  today.  Our  first  guest  is  Laszlo  Varro,  who  joined  Shell in  2021  as  the  VP  of  Global  Business  Environment,  looking  at  scenarios  and  pathways.  He  joined,  after  10  years at  the  International  Energy  Agency,  where  he  was  most  recently  their  chief  economist.  In  his  role  at  Shell,  he  leads  up  the  scenarios  team,  which  explores  how  the  global  energy  system  could  evolve  right  the  way  through  to  the  end  of  the  century.  So  Laszlo,  it's  great  to  have  you  on  the  show. Laszlo Varro: Thank  you  very  much.  It's  a  pleasure  to  be  here. Julia Streets: And  joining  us  today  is  Dr.  Nat  Keohane,  who  is  the  president  of  C2ES,  the  Center  of  Climate  and  Energy  Solutions.  Before  taking  on  that  role  in  July  2021,  Nat  served  for  eight  years  as  a  senior  vice  president  for  climate  with  the  Environmental  Defense  Fund  where  he  led  all  of  EDF's  climates  work  in  the  United  States  and  globally.  So  Nat,  thank  you  so  much  for  being  with  us. Dr. Nat Keohane: Thanks  very  much  for  having  me. Julia Streets: So  Laszlo,  in  the  introduction,  I  mentioned  that  you  lead  the  scenarios  team  at  Shell.  Can  you  talk  us  through  what  we  mean  when  you  talk  about  these  scenarios? 02:34:18 Laszlo Varro: Scenario  analysis  came  out  of  Cold  War  strategic  assessments.  Shell  was  historically  the  first  company  to  use  it  for  strategic  analysis,  so  we  are  continuing  a  time- honored  tradition.  Scenarios  have  decision  makers  navigating  uncertainties  by  reflecting  on  plausible  futures.  The  Shell  scenarios  are  not  Shell's  predictions,  they  are  not  Shell's  commitments  and  they're  not  Shell's  strategy.  They  are  part  of  the  information  base  that  the  leadership  had  navigating  through  the  uncertain  world.  Now  in  2022,  it's  fair  to  say  that  history  was  teaching  us  some  very  tragic  lessons  about  uncertainties.  Even  before  the  war,  there  were tensions  and  fissures  in  the  energy  system.  The  post- COVID  recovery  in  2021  was  exceptionally  energy-intensive.  Global  carbon  dioxide  emissions  stabilized  at  a  level  which  is  entirely  unsustainable.  Geopolitical  intentions  were  already  emerging,  and  debates  were  already  emerging  on  the  future  of  globalization. Now,  on  top  of  these  existing  tensions,  the  Russian  aggression  against  Ukraine  is  not  only  a  human  tragedy – most  importantly,  it  is  a  human  tragedy – but  it  was  also  a  geopolitical  energy  shock,  which  hasn't  happened  since  the  1970s  shocks  of  the  Yom  Kippur  War  and  the  Iranian  Revolution.  It created a  new  energy  reality.  Some  of  the  impacts  are  helping  the  energy  transition,  other  impacts  are  hindering  the  energy  transition.  There  are  regionally  divergent  responses  and,  basically,  we  were assessing  the  regionally  divergent  political,  social,  economic  responses  and  asked  the  question how they  can  shape  the  energy  system  in  a  direction  where  humanity  would  like  to  go. 04:27:16 Julia Streets: So  let's  explore  these  scenarios  a  little  further  if  we  may.  So  there  are  two  that  I  think  are  particularly  salient  today.  Could  you  just  talk  us  through  those  two scenarios?  Then  I'd  love  to  bring  in  Nat  for  your  reaction  and  your  thoughts.  Laszlo. 04:39:29 Laszlo Varro: We  felt  that,  in  the world of 2022-2023,  social  and  political  priorities  on  security  are  a  given.  They  are  just  a  fact  of  life.  But  the  two  scenarios,  the  two  pathways,  are  distinguished  by  what  is  the  actual  interpretation  of  security.  What  do  we  mean  by  security  and  how  do  we  try  to  achieve  that?  In  one  of  the  pathways,  we call that  Archipelagos,  security  is  achieved  by  sticking  to  the  existing  well  understood  conventional  energy  system,  energy  infrastructure  and  capital  stock,  and  security  increases  the  importance  of  domestic  hydrocarbon  resources  or  hydrocarbon  imports  from  friendly  countries.  There  are  signals  and  signposts  in  that  direction.  Last  year,  we  have  seen  a  surge  of  domestic  coal  production  all  around  the  world.  China,  for  example,  expanded  its  domestic  coal  production  in  energy  terms  by  seven  exajoules.  Just  for  the  sake  of  comparison,  all  the  oil  and  gas  that  Shell  produces  worldwide  is  around  six  exajoules  in  energy  terms. So  the  increase  in  domestic  coal  mining  in  China  last  year  was  more  than  the  entire  hydrocarbon  production  of  Shell.  Now  we  also  designed  another  scenario - we  called  it  Sky -  in  which  the  interpretation  of  security  is  very  different.  In  this  scenario,  society  regards  the  fossil  fuel  dominated  energy  system  itself  as  a  security  risk.  Very  clearly,  the  fact  that  it  was  Russia,  a  major  oil  and  gas  producer  which  launched  a  geopolitical  aggression,  it  reinforced  the  already  existing  political  and  media  narrative  that  oil  and  gas  are  the  problem  and renewable  energy  is  the  solution.  This  is  a  scenario  in  which  society  flees  forward  and  achieves  security  by  an  accelerated transformation  of  the  energy  system. 06:41:37 Julia Streets: Thank  you  for  setting  out  those  two  scenarios  because  what  strikes  me  is  that  one  of  them  very  much  starts  with  the  premise  of  where  we  are  today  and  where  we're  headed,  and  that  is  the  Archipelagos.  The  second,  Sky,  as  you  call  it,  starts  with  a  future  point  and  then  works  backwards  from  that. Nat,  I  know  you've  looked  at  these. I'd  love  to  get  your  reactions. 07:05:06 Dr. Nat Keohane: Any  scenarios  like  this  are  primarily  useful  for  making  comparisons.  Any  individual  scenario  is  bound  to  be  wrong  in  the  details,  so  these  aren't  crystal  balls,  but  by  comparing  the  scenarios  and  looking  at  where  they  have  consistent  themes  and  where  they  diverge,  we  can  learn  a  lot.  So that's  how  I  want  to  be  approaching  these.  So  under  both  scenarios  that  Shell  has  released,  renewables  increase  while  fossil  decreases.  The  difference  is  how  fast.  And  because  of  those  dynamics,  as  well  as  similar  consistent  transitions  in  transport  and  industry,  in  both  scenarios,  we  see  global  CO2,  carbon  dioxide  emissions  peaking  and  starting  to  decline  within  a  decade.  One  interesting  finding  in  fact  from  the  Archipelagos  scenario  that  Laszlo  mentioned  is  that  the  energy  security  concerns  from  the  Russian  invasion  of  Ukraine  actually  accelerate  the  pace  of  the  energy  transition.  It's  also  important  to  note  this  isn't  the  only  evidence  we  have  for  this. The  International  Energy  Agency  in  a  recent  report  and  the  other  oil  major  BP,  and  it  just  published  Energy  Outlook, both  found  similar  conclusions.  In  other  words,  even  under  projected  trends,  we're  turning  the  corner  on  fossil  fuel  consumption  and  emissions  in  the  near  term.  The  low  carbon  energy  transition  is  no  longer  a  matter  of  if  but  when.  And so this  is  where  it's  useful  to  look  at  the  divergence  between  those  scenarios  because  that  divergence  points  to  what  we  need  to  do  to  accelerate  that  transition  much  faster  than  it  would  otherwise  happen.  And it's  very  clear.  We  need  to  rapidly  decarbonize,  clean  up  the  electric  grid,  even  as  we  expand  energy  access  in  developing  countries,  and  even  as  we  shift  much  of  our  economy,  including  transportation  and  industry  to  run  on  electricity. We  need  to  develop  new  fuels  for  aviation  and  new  technologies  to  make  heavy  industrial  products  like  cement  and  steel.  We  need  to  develop  and  deploy  new  technologies  from  scratch  like  green  zero- carbon  hydrogen  and  carbon  removal  technologies  to  take  carbon  out  of  the  atmosphere  and  we  need  to  scale  them  up  and  we  need  to  transform  land  use  so  we  store  much  more  carbon  in  soils  and  forests.  All  of  those  things  are  highlighted  in  the  scenarios.  To  do  all  of  that,  we  really  need  government  policies  at  a  much  more  ambitious  scale  than  we  have  now. 09:26:29 Julia Streets: I'm  really  curious  now  to  know  what  the  current  shifting  dynamics  are.  As  I  mentioned  in  my  open,  we  are  one  year  into  conflict.  And  what  impact  has  the  war  in  Ukraine  had  on  the  pace  of  change?  Nat,  can  I  come  to  you  first? 09:42:43 Dr. Nat Keohane: My  sense  in  terms  of  what  Russia's  invasion  of  Ukraine  has  done  is  that  by  highlighting  energy  security  concerns,  it  turns  out  many  of  the  ways  to  improve  energy  security  align  with  reducing  fossil  fuel  use,  at  least  in  the  medium  and  long  term.  Not  right  away,  and  that's  a  problem.  Right  away,  we  see  a  bump  up  in  the  use  of  coal  in  some  areas,  and if  that  locks  in,  we're  in  real  trouble.  But  at  least  what  the  scenarios  are  showing  us  is  that  the  shift  to  a  focus  on  energy  security  can  actually  help  shift  towards  more  renewables,  and  so,  that's  an  important  additional  dynamic. 10:17:24 Julia Streets: Laszlo,  let  me  get  your  reactions  to  that. 10:21:26 Laszlo Varro: I  broadly  agree  with  everything  that  Nat  said.  We  tried  to  enrich  the  analysis  by  going  into  the  regional  dimension,  because  there  was  no  single  global  response.  Europe  is  the  eye  of  the  storm.  It  is  Europe  where  the  energy  crisis  had  by  far  the  biggest  impact.  Now,  Europe  mobilized  very  large  amounts  of  money  for  the  short-term  crisis  management  essentially  buying  liquified  natural  gas  at  whatever  price  from  anywhere  around  the  world  and  also  supporting  consumers. But  Europe  also,  as  Nat  mentioned,  very  strongly  reinforced  its  clean  energy  policies.  Essentially,  the  clean  energy  transition  in  Europe  emerged  as  the  overarching  organizing  principle  of  policy.  And  very  importantly,  this  is  a  situation  where  the  average  European  consumer  needed  no  explanation  that there  is  a  crisis.  So  last  year,  there  was  a  warm  winter  in  Europe  and  a  warm  winter  reduces  heating  energy  demand.  That's  well  understood. But  when  you  statistically  analyze  the  demand  data  and  you  adjust  with  the  temperature,  it  turns  out  that  the  demand  decline  in  European  heating  gas  use  was  around  10  billion  cubic  meters  more  than  the  temperature  can  explain.  So 10  billion  cubic  meters  of  gas,  which  is  like  switching  off  the  heating  in  5  million  homes,  was  delivered  by  people  voluntarily  changing  their  behavior.  Now  you  jump  over  to  the  United  States.  So  the  United  States  is  embarking  on  a  journey  to  decarbonize  a  high  energy  consumption  American  lifestyle,  which  requires  innovation  and  requires  investment.  You  could  observe  the  main  US  policy  reaction,  the  Inflation  Reduction  Act,  primarily  focuses  on  increasing  investment  in  clean  energy  supply.  There  is  no  carbon  pricing  in  the  Inflation  Reduction  Act,  but  there  are  very,  very  strong  incentives  to  build,  build  and  build  more  and  more  clean  energy  supply.  Again,  when  you  jump  further,  China.  China,  up  until  recently,  was  largely  self- sufficient  from  coal. Their  domestic  coal  production  played  an  important  role  in  maintaining  energy  security,  but  at  the  same  time,  in all  the  relevant  clean  energy  technologies -  wind  power,  solar  power,  nuclear  power -  China's  investment  activity  is  comparable  to  Europe  and  the  United  States  combined.  It's  a  massive  scale  leapfrogging  from  domestic  coal  to  domestic  solar  and  from  domestic  coal  to  domestic  nuclear.  Last  but  not  least,  the  developing  world  outside  China,  we  call  them  the  surfers  in  our  analysis  because  these  are  countries  that  are  surfing  the  waves  of  opportunity.  These  are  countries  which  were  very  badly  hit  by  the  European  energy  crisis.  One  good  example  is  Pakistan.  There  was  even  a  European  company  which  defaulted  on  a  contractual  obligation  to  supply  gas  to  Pakistan  because  even  after  the  penalties,  it  was  more  profitable  to  bring  the  gas  to  Europe. Pakistan  recently  had  a  gigantic  blackout,  200  million  people  without  electricity.  And the  Pakistani  government  essentially  announced  recently  that, "We  are  going  to  increase  our  qualified  power  generation  capacity  by  a  factor  of  four  and  we  are  going  to  dig  out  our  domestic  coal  and  just  burn  it  and  maintain  security  that  way."  So  there  have  been  divergent  responses,  but  overall,  what  we  see  in  our  analysis  is  that  even  our  more  conservative,     scenario,  is  actually  a  considerably  lower  temperature  increase  than  what  was  feared  just  a  couple  of  years  ago  in  the  climate  assessments.  There  is  no  such  thing  as  a  business  as  usual  scenario  anymore. 14:09:19 Julia Streets: What  does  this  mean  for  the  energy  transition  ambition?  Are  we  going  to  hit  that  ambitious  target  or  are  we  going  to  fall  short? 14:19:28 Dr. Nat Keohane: Maybe  I  can  start  with  just  a  little  bit  of  context  on  where  we  are  relative  to  those  global  targets.  The  Paris  Agreement  on  climate  change  sets  that  goal  of  keeping  that  rise  in  average  global  temperatures  well  below  two  degrees  above  pre- industrial  levels  and  striving  for 1. 5.  The  more  science  we  have  and  the  more  we  learn,  the  more  we  realize  that  1. 5  is  really  a  much,  much  safer  place  to  be.  So where  are  we?  We're  at  1. 1  today  and  the  scenarios  as  we  were  talking  about,  the  more  conservative  scenario  goes  to  2.2.  There's  a  lot  of  uncertainty.  Let's  say  2  to  2. 5  degrees  Celsius  by  the  end  of  the  century. On  the  one  hand  that  is  a  lot  of  progress  since  before  the  Paris  Agreement.  Before  the  Paris  Agreement,  we  were  looking  at  3. 5  to  4  degrees  in  terms  of  projected  temperature  increase.  Now  we're  looking  at  2  to  2. 5.  Again,  everything  is  uncertain,  but  2 to  2. 5  under  this  conservative  scenario.  Why  is  that?  The  technology  changes  we've  talked  about,  the  accelerations  in  innovation,  but  also  the  Paris  Agreement  gets  some  credit  for  that.  The  Paris  Agreement  has  created  a  framework  for  cooperation  that  is  starting  to  work. And,  the  theme  of  the  day,  we  need  to  accelerate  that  much  faster  if  we're  going  to  get  below  2  and  down  to  1. 5,  all  of  those  things  that  the  scenarios  talk  about,  how  are  we  going  to  do  that?  We  need  to  leverage  the  Paris  Agreement  and  government  policies  at  all  levels,  national,  state,  local.  We  need  to  leverage  them  to  really  accelerate  that  clean  energy  transition. 15:52:20 Julia Streets: Laszlo. 15:55:21 Laszlo Varro: A  timely  energy  transition  which  satisfies  the  objectives  of  the  Paris  Agreement,  and  that  includes  the  Sky  scenario,  which  was  explicitly  designed  to  satisfy  the  ambitions  of  Paris,  is  consistent  with  our  roughly  2,  3  thousand  billion  dollars  per  year  increase  in  average  annual  clean  energy  investment.  Total  capital  investment  in  clean  energy  globally  is thousand  billion  dollars  per  year  today.  A  very  sizable  chunk  of  that  is  wind  and  solar,  but  biofuels,  hydrogen,  other  technologies  also  play  a  role, and this roughly a thousand billion dollars per year, will have to go to, depending on how you model it, somewhere around 4, 000  billion  dollars per  year.  Now,  in  order  to  achieve  that,  a  couple  of  things  are  needed.  First  of  all,  the  money.  Now  in  the Western  financial  system  in  Europe  and  the  United  States,  there  is  a  very  strong  appetite  for  clean  energy  investment,  but  90%  of  that  clean  energy  investment  funding  stays  in the Western  world  and  only  10%  flows  to  developing  countries,  where  clean  energy  is  critically  underfunded.  So  one  factor  where  the  two  scenarios  start  differing  from  each  other,  that  in  Sky,  the  financial  system  effectively  channels  that  capital  into  clean  energy  investment  in the  developing  world.  The  only  way  to  achieve  that  is  to  mobilize  the  power  of  modern  capitalism  and  turn  the  energy  transition  into  a  profitable  investment  opportunity.  The  second  thing  that  you  need  after  you  have  the  money  is  the  equipment.  You  need  the  wind  turbines,  the  solar  panels,  the  batteries.  You  need  the  metals  that  they  are  made  from,  so  you  need  the  copper,  the  nickel,  the lithium.  You  need  the  manufacturing  capacity  and  you  need  value  chains  which  are  secure  and  are  trusted  from  a  political  point  of  view.  So  again,  Sky  is  a  scenario  in  which  the  scale  up  of  the  clean  energy  value  chains  and  the  metal  supply  is  managed  appropriately.  In  Archipelagos,  this  emerges  as  a  barrier. And  last  but  not  least,  after  you  have  the  money  and  you  have  the  equipment,  you  need  to  have  a  legal  permission  to  build  those  things  and  you  need  to  be  able  to  connect  them  to  the  grid, and  the  legal  processes  and  the  licensing  and  permitting  environments  in  many  countries  in  the  world  are  not  in  line  with  the  need  to  rapidly  scale  up  green  energy  investment.  So there's  a  very  important  task  for  governments  to  modernize  the  regulatory  environment  and  enable  this  industrial  investment  to  go  ahead. 18:12:21 Dr. Nat Keohane: I'm  really  with  Laszlo  in  what  he  said  about  the  finance  that's  needed  and  how  we  mobilize  that.  We  need  trillions  of  dollars.  He  said  thousands  of  billions.  Trillions.  That's  the  same  thing.  I  just  want  to  underscore  that.  That's  what  we  need  in  terms  of  driving  more  climate  finance.  Now  some  of  that  does  need  to  come  from  governments.  The  US,  the  richest  country  in  the  world – we  need  to  be  providing  more  climate  finance.  It's  shameful,  frankly,  that  the  US  only...  It  provides  a  fraction  of  the  climate  finance  commitments we've  pledged.  Only  a  few  billion  dollars  in  climate  finance  a  year.  That  needs  to  be  much  greater.  And  that's  talking  about  billions  and  we  need  to  be  talking  about  trillions.  How  are  we  going  to  do  that  with  government  policies  at  the  national  and  international  levels  that  mobilize  the  private  sector? The  scenarios  talk  about  the  importance  of  carbon  markets  and  carbon  trading.  Article  six  of  the  Paris  Agreement  provides  a  framework  for  that.  We  need  to  accelerate  that.  The  best  policy  to  align  incentives  and  mobilize  capital  is  always  a  price  on  carbon.  The  European  Union  has  that.  Other  countries  are  putting  that  in  place  through  various  market- based  approaches.  If  we  can't  do  that,  then  we  ought  to  look  for  other  ways  to  create  incentives  to  drive  capital  into  those  new  technologies.  Final  point,  we've  talked  a  lot  about  increasing  the  build  out  of  clean  technologies  and  accelerating  innovation  in  zero  carbon  technologies  like  wind  and  solar  and  hydrogen  and  so  on.  That's  really  important,  but  it's  not  sufficient.  We  also  have  to  accelerate  the  phase  out  of  the  fossil  fuel  that  we're  already  consuming,  starting  with  coal  plants,  but  also  going  to  oil  and  gas.  We  need  to  accelerate  the  phase  out  of  the  high-carbon  fuels  even  as  we  are  accelerating  the  build-out  of  the  clean  technologies  because  we  have  to  do  both  of  those  things  if  we're  going  to  meet  our  targets. 22:26:17 Julia Streets: So  let's  close  out  our  discussion  today  by  asking  you  what  would  you  want  the  audience  to  do?  Nat,  can  I  come  to  you  first? 20:39:28 Dr. Nat Keohane: Sure,  thanks.  We've  just  been  talking  about  the  need  for  government  policy,  for  well-designed  government  policies  at  all  levels,  national,  state,  local,  international,  to  drive  the  clean  energy  transition  and  accelerate  that  phase-out  away  from the  high-carbon  fuels.  Those  government  policies  rest  on  a  foundation  of  political  will  and  citizen  engagement,  at  least  in  much  of  the  world. So  what  I  always  say  is  the  most  important  thing  that  individuals  can  do  is  make  your  voice  heard  on  climate.  Make  this  a  priority.  When  you  go  to  the  voting  booth,  if  you're  in  democracy,  if  you're  in  the  US,  you're  elsewhere,  make  this  a  priority  for  your  voting.  Talk  to  your  friends  about  it,  talk  to  your  relatives.  The  importance  of  talking  and  building  awareness  about  not  only  the  state  of  play  in  terms  of  the  climate  crisis,  where  we're  headed  and  how  urgent  it  is,  but  also  the  optimism,  the  note  that  we  can  shift  that  trajectory,  that  we  are  shifting  it  and  we  just  need  to  accelerate  that  change.  That's  where  I  always  start. 21:36:44 Julia Streets: Laszlo,  what  would  you  want  the  listeners  to  do? 21:41:46 Laszlo Varro: So  as  a  citizen,  you  interact  with  the  energy  system  through  three  channels.  You  have  three  hats.  One,  as  a  citizen,  you  are  a  participant  in  a  political  system,  you  vote  in  elections.  Second,  you are  an  investor.  The  financial  system  channels  your  money  into  investment.  Third,  you are a consumer.  It  is  your  consumer  decisions  which  orient  a  modern  market  economy.  When  you  wear  your  first  hat,  be  aware  that  governments  will  have  to  implement  energy  and  climate  policies  that  were  conventionally  thought  to  be  politically  impossible.  So make  it  possible.  Send  a  signal  to  the  political  system  that  you  want  those  policies.  When  you  wear  your  investor  hat,  ask  hard  questions  from  the  financial  institutions  that  manage  your  money  and  consciously  steer  your  investments  toward  the green  energy  space. Last  but  not  least,  consumers  also  play  a  very  important  role  in  creating  the  market  for  new  low  carbon  products  and  solutions.  So be  there  and  send  a  signal  towards  the  modern  market  economy.  The  capitalist  market  economy  is  incredibly  effective  to  provide  you  what  you  demand,  but  you  have  to  demand  it.  So use  all  of  your  three  hats  and  use  all of the three channels. 23:13:19 Julia Streets: So Dr. Nat Keohane, thank you so much for being with us and for all  your  thoughts  today. 23:18:26 Dr. Nat Keohane: Thanks  very  much  for  having  me.  It's  been  a  pleasure. 23:20:29 Julia Streets: And  Laszlo Varro,  thank  you  for  being  with  us. 23:24:31 Laszlo Varro: Thank you very much. Thank you very much, Nat, for joining us. MUSIC BED COMES IN 23:20:38 Julia Streets: Another  fascinating  discussion.  We  started  by  laying  out  two  very  specific  energy  security  scenarios,  one  called  Sky  and  one  called  Archipelagos.  Of  course,  you  can  find  links  to  those  on  the  episode  page.  Then  we  thought  about  what  is  the  impact  of  the  Russia- Ukraine  war  because  ultimately,  we're  trying  to  drive  change  at  pace  and  scale,  but  we  are  not  doing  this  in  isolation.  We're  doing  this  very  much  on  an  international  playing  field  and  there  are  regional  and  national  dynamics  and  considerations  at  play.  Then  of  course,  we  brought  it  right  the  way  back  down  to  what  can  we  do  as  listeners  of  this  podcast?  What  can  we  all  do  to  play  our  part?  My  thanks  to  both  Laszlo  Varro  and  Dr.  Nat  Keohane  for  all  their  thoughts  today.  You've  been  listening  to  the  Energy  Podcast  brought  to  you  by  Shell,  and  you  can  listen  and  follow  for  free  wherever  you  get  your  podcasts  so  you  don't  miss  a  single  episode  because  next  time,  we're  exploring  the  role  that  carbon  markets  can  play  in  keeping  global  temperature  rise  below  1. 5  degrees  Celsius.  The  Energy  Podcast  is  a  Fresh  Air  Production,  and  I  must  remind  you  that  the  views  you've  heard  today  from  individuals  not  affiliated  with  Shell  are  their  own  and  not  Shell  plc  or  its  affiliates.  I'm  Julia  Streets.  Thank  you  for  listening  and  until  next  time.  Goodbye.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
    21.3.2023
    24:52
  • 1.5 C and… what’s next?
    With COP27 closed out, The Energy Podcast hears different perspectives from people who attended the conference in Egypt, and their views on what needs to happen next. Presented by Julia Streets. Featuring Rebekah Shirley, World Resources Institute Africa; Susan Shannon, Shell; Eduarda Zoghbi, Global Student Energy; Andrea Bonzanni, International Emissions Trading Association. The Energy Podcast is a Fresh Air Production for Shell, produced by Annie Day.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
    12.12.2022
    33:27
  • 1. 5 C and… turning ambition into action
    The 2022 UN Climate Change Conference, or COP27, will be taking place in Egypt between 6th and 18th November with a strong focus on Africa. As the conference gets underway, The Energy Podcast takes a look at what to expect. Presented by Julia Streets. Featuring Prudence Glorious, Chief Purpose Officer at Tanzanian impact firm PZG PR, and Shell’s Chief Climate Change Adviser, David Hone. The Energy Podcast is a Fresh Air Production for Shell, produced by Annie Day.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
    4.11.2022
    28:07
  • 1.5 C and… chemicals
    In the third episode of our series on heavy industry we explore chemicals. From t-shirts and trainers, medicines and mattresses, to cars and computers, phones and TVs, our modern-day lives are filled with products made from chemicals. But the chemicals industry produces a lot of CO2 emissions. What can be done to reduce these emissions? The Energy Podcast investigates. Presented by Julia Streets. Featuring Peter Goult from Systemiq, Naoko Ishii from the University of Tokyo and Robin Mooldijk from Shell. Additional reporting by Alexander Mante. The Energy Podcast is a Fresh Air Production for Shell, produced by Annie Day. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
    1.11.2022
    26:48

Weitere Wissenschaft Podcasts

Über The Energy Podcast

The world faces a critical challenge: how to meet growing energy demand while urgently reducing carbon dioxide emissions. It means the global energy system must change. Will innovation come to the rescue? How will renewable energy evolve? Does the oil and gas industry have a future? Will batteries, hydrogen or even blockchain alter the way we live, work and travel? The Energy Podcast by Shell explores these questions. We speak to the engineers at the pioneering edge of science and technology, the experts tracking progress towards the goals of the Paris Agreement, and the entrepreneurs working to drive the change.
Podcast-Website

Hören Sie The Energy Podcast, REINGEZWITSCHERT – der Vogel-Podcast und viele andere Radiosender aus aller Welt mit der radio.at-App

The Energy Podcast

The Energy Podcast

Jetzt kostenlos herunterladen und einfach Radio hören.

Google Play StoreApp Store

The Energy Podcast: Zugehörige Podcasts